Essays & Images on Cities, Travel and Contemporary Culture. A web journal of James A. Clapp, Ph.D., an UrbisMedia Ltd. Production

CQQ-No.004: EPONYMOUS CITIES

©2004 UrbisMedia

©2004 UrbisMedia

When Stalingrad was returned to its original name of Volgagrad nasty Joe Stalin must have been spinning in his grave (in which he was placed by Kruschev who ejected him from Lenin’s mausoleum). Lenin, of course, not long ago lost his city to one of its former names.

There are lots of ways to earn fame by eponym: come up with something worthy of an “-ism (Freudianism, Marxism, etc.), or maybe an invention (the guillotine), or something really big (Christianity). Barring a fate like Stalin’s or Lenin’s (though they each have their own “-ism” to compensate for their lost cities), eponymous fame is usually enduring.

But having a city named after one is certainly a special honor, although, as history has shown, urban eponyms may not have the endurance of ideas, or cities. Below are a score of cities to be matched with the persons for whom they are named.

Click to: Take the online quiz.

Click to: Take the online quiz.

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©2004, ©2015, James A. Clapp (UrbisMedia Ltd. Pub. 1.1.2004)

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