Essays & Images on Cities, Travel and Contemporary Culture. A web journal of James A. Clapp, Ph.D., an UrbisMedia Ltd. Production

CQQ-No.020: City Squares

Piranesi's vedute of Piazza Navona

Piranesi’s vedute of Piazza Navona

Plato calculated the ideal population of a city to be around 5000—the maximum number that could hear a political official at a public assembly in the agora of Athens. In addition to its “civic”

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CQQ-No.019: Holy Places

Façade of St.Paul's, Macao, China. ©2001, James A. Clapp

Façade of St.Paul’s, Macao, China. ©2001, James A. Clapp

Urban and social historian Lewis Mumford offered in The City in History that the early “permanent settlements” that were the precursors of cities were themselves built around burial places and religious

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CQQ-No.018: Urban Disasters

Meidner, Ludwig, APOKALYPTISCHE LANDSCHAFT (1913)

Meidner, Ludwig, APOKALYPTISCHE LANDSCHAFT (1913)

Cities have never been the favored offspring of Mother Nature. Let’s face it, one doesn’t even have to be a tree-hugging eco-warrior to admit that cities have been tough on their environments

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CQQ-No.017: City Nicknames

Passage in Prague. ©2004, UrbisMedia

Passage in Prague. ©2004, UrbisMedia

In a person the acquisition of a nickname can come about as a result of a personality characteristic (John “Duke” Wayne), stature (Napoleon “The Little Corporal” Bonaparte), a prominent feature

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CQQ-No.016: City Squares

 Sienna's Piazza Publico, from the City Hall tower. ©2004, James A. Clapp


Sienna’s Piazza Publico, from the City Hall tower. ©2004, James A. Clapp

Plato calculated the ideal population of a city to be around 5000—the maximum number that could hear a political official at a public assembly in the agora of Athens. In addition to its “civic”

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CQQ-No.015: Namesake Cities

La Grue de Paris, Texas. ©2004 UrbisMedia

La Grue de Paris, Texas. ©2004 UrbisMedia

Cities come by their names from a variety of sources, the most common probably being named after a founder or favorite son or daughter, a geographic or geological feature, a god or a saint whose blessing

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CQQ-No.014: Novel Cities

CQQ014_citybooks-web

Henry Miller once declared: “One needs no artificial stimulation in Paris, to write, the atmosphere is charged with creation.” This opinion may extend to many different writers about

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CQQ-No.013: Twin Cities

Pest, from the heights of Buda; joined at the Danube. © UrbisMedia

Pest, from the heights of Buda; joined at the Danube. © UrbisMedia

The city we know today as Budapest, was once the cities of Buda and Pest. However, most cities that grow together and share the same water sources, air, and often. economic circumstances, retain their

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CQQ-No.012: Holy Addresses

Swedagon pagoda dominates the center of Rangoon, Burma. ©2002, James A. Clapp

Swedagon pagoda dominates the center of Rangoon, Burma. ©2002, James A. Clapp

Urban and social historian Lewis Mumford offered in The City in History that the early “permanent settlements” that were the precursors of cities were themselves built around burial places

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CQQ-No.011: What the Locals Call ‘em

©2004 UrbisMedia

©2004 UrbisMedia

To a German the city of Venice is Vendig ; to a Frenchman it’s Venise ; to an American it is, of course, Venice. None of these spellings and pronunciations is, however, how the denizens of

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